Glen Cranny

Managing Director

Glen has specialised in criminal law since 1995 and has been a principal of Gilshenan & Luton since 2000. He is today recognised as one of the most prominent criminal lawyers in Queensland. Doyle’s Guide to the Legal Profession lists him as a preeminent Queensland and Australian criminal lawyer.

Glen advises and represents clients in all aspects of criminal law. He also assists government officials and professionals in relation to disciplinary and regulatory investigations.

Glen’s areas of expertise include:

  • white collar crime;
  • sexual and violent offences;
  • CCC investigations; and
  • the defence of professional misconduct allegations.

He is often retained to conduct workplace investigations in both the public and private sectors, and is also very experienced in representing clients in commissions of inquiry, WHS prosecutions and coronial inquests.

Glen is a leading author in the areas of criminal law and disciplinary investigations in Queensland. He was a member of the Queensland Law Society’s inaugural criminal law specialist accreditation committee, and was the Chair of the Law Society’s criminal law section from 2008 to 2014.

In 2010 Glen was appointed as a Senior Counsellor of the Queensland Law Society. He is a panel member appointed by both the Law Society and the Queensland Bar Association to assist other lawyers with professional complaint matters.

In 2019, Glen was awarded the Queensland Law Society President’s Medal, in recognition of his dedication to community access to justice, law and policy reform, upholding the rule of law and administration of justice for Queenslanders.

Glen is married to Lisa, with three daughters. His personal interests include politics (watching, not playing!), music and rugby league.

 

 

 

 

 

Recent articles by Glen

Police search warrants – your rights

Dealing with police search warrants - the do's and don'ts

Under Queensland law, the police can execute a search warrant upon private premises in circumstances where they have reasonable grounds to suspect that they will locate evidence of a criminal offence.
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Workplace misconduct involving criminal allegations

Workplace investigations involving criminal allegations

When allegations of misconduct in the workplace involve criminal behaviour, some different considerations arise compared to other workplace investigations.
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Rights of employees under workplace investigation

The rights of employees under workplace investigation

If you are being investigated for alleged misconduct in the workplace, you have various rights that have to be met by your employer, and any investigator retained by your employer.
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Tips for employers conducting workplace investigations

6 tips for employers conducting workplace investigations

Allegations of workplace misconduct may involve suggestions of professional rule violations, workplace misbehaviour such as sexual harassment or misuse of resources, or even criminal conduct such as fraud or stealing.
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