About

We are a leading Queensland criminal law and employment law firm.

Led by directors Glen Cranny, Craig Pratt, Callan Lloyd, Melanie Morris, and Patrick Quinn, Gilshenan & Luton is renowned as a law firm that delivers high-quality service and results to its clients.

Commencing in 1924 with the practice of John “Jack” Gilshenan, the firm has always been based in Brisbane whilst serving the needs of clients all over Queensland.

In 1958, Leo Luton joined Jack in partnership, and Gilshenan & Luton commenced practice by that name. In the decades thereafter, the firm built a strong reputation across many areas of law.

At the forefront of our practice, though, has always been criminal law and employment law. We have been continually involved in many of Queensland’s largest and most prominent criminal cases, inquests, and commissions of inquiry over many years.

In 2008 the firm decided to specialise solely in its two core areas of practice – criminal law and employment matters. Since that time the firm has only strengthened its reputation in these areas, solidifying its reputation as the best criminal and employment law firm in Queensland.   

We continue to win peer-judged awards and recommendations for the quality of our work and regularly receive referrals from Queensland’s leading commercial and litigation firms seeking assistance for clients with criminal law or employment issues.

Our work extends across many industries, including law enforcement, health, and the legal and financial professions. Our clients cover a wide range of corporate and individual interests, including business people, government entities and officials, and individuals looking for representation and service of the highest quality.

Latest Articles

Worker’s general protections claim fails in the Federal Court

Worker’s general protections claim fails in the Federal Court

A Federal Court employment law decision in 2024 emphasises what is required when establishing that the making of a complaint constitutes the exercise of a workplace right for the purposes of a general protections claim under the Fair Work Act.
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Assault occasioning bodily harm explained

Assault occasioning bodily harm explained

Assault occasioning bodily harm is a very common offence of violence, and falls within the broad category of assault offences. It is a more serious offence than common assault, but less serious than grievous bodily harm.
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Update on stop bullying orders – FedEx workers fail in Fair Work Commission

Update on stop bullying orders – FedEx workers fail in Fair Work Commission

In 2023, a number of workers engaged by FedEx Australia made an application to the Fair Work Commission for a “stop bullying order” against FedEx and one of its managers. The application was ultimately denied by the Fair Work Commission.
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Employee suspension – when can it be done?

Employee suspension – when can it be done?

Often, employers feel the need to remove an employee from the workplace. In these situations, proper processes for employee suspension must be followed to avoid allegations of breach of the employment contract and/or applications for general protection orders.
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