Equitable Briefing Policy

Gilshenan & Luton is committed to fair and equitable practises in the course of its legal practice.  We are a signatory to the Law Council of Australia's Equitable Briefing Policy

The goal of the policy is to promote equity and diversity across the legal profession, by encouraging law firms like ours to make all reasonable endeavours to brief female barristers with relevant seniority and expertise in their relevant practice area.  

The policy does not undermine a client's right to select the barrister of their choice but seeks to ensure that an appropriately diverse range of counsel is considered for each prospective brief. 

We are proud to adopt this policy as one tangible way of encouraging and reflecting an appropriately diverse and inclusive workplace.

Latest Articles

Will my criminal prosecution be before a jury or a judge only?

Criminal trials before a jury or judge alone

There are numerous factors that weigh into the issue of whether a criminal prosecution will have a trial by jury or by judge alone. In Queensland, trials in the District and Supreme Courts are generally held in front of a jury and judge, while trials in the Magistrates Court are determined, by the presiding Magistrate alone.
Read more
How to protest lawfully in Queensland

Protesting lawfully in Queensland: the law, the process and the risks involved

The right of peaceful assembly, commonly referred to protesting, is considered a key pillar of a democratic society. In Queensland, the right to assemble peacefully in a public place is recognised in the Peaceful Assembly Act.
Read more
When does workplace bullying constitute corrupt conduct?

When does workplace bullying constitute corrupt conduct?

The Crime and Corruption Commission (CCC) has published a paper examining when workplace bullying reaches the legal threshold to constitute corrupt conduct under the Crime and Corruption Act 2001.
Read more
Corporate Criminal Responsibility Review 2020

Corporate criminal responsibility under review

The long-awaited reform of Australia’s laws regarding the criminal responsibility of corporate entities (companies) is moving closer to completion. In Australia today the prosecution of companies is far less common than the prosecution of individuals, even in relation to what might be regarded as ‘white-collar’ or business-related offending.
Read more