Equitable Briefing Policy

Gilshenan & Luton is committed to fair and equitable practises in the course of its legal practice.  We are a signatory to the Law Council of Australia's Equitable Briefing Policy

The goal of the policy is to promote equity and diversity across the legal profession, by encouraging law firms like ours to make all reasonable endeavours to brief female barristers with relevant seniority and expertise in their relevant practice area.  

The policy does not undermine a client's right to select the barrister of their choice but seeks to ensure that an appropriately diverse range of counsel is considered for each prospective brief. 

We are proud to adopt this policy as one tangible way of encouraging and reflecting an appropriately diverse and inclusive workplace.

Latest Articles

Charged with “being in charge of a motor vehicle while under the influence of liquor or a drug”

What does it mean to be ‘in charge’ of a motor vehicle?

In this interesting drink driving case, the court found the defendant not guilty of driving under the influence where he was found asleep in the driver’s seat with the engine running.
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New casual employee definition inserted into the Fair Work Act

The impact of the casual employee definition for employers and employees

On 4 August 2021 the High Court finally delivered its decision in WorkPac Pty Ltd v Rossato & Ors, bringing clarity to the meaning of ‘casual employee’.
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Strict new laws apply to Queensland drivers from 26 July 2021, relating to the use of mobile phones and seatbelts.

Higher penalties: mobile phone use and seatbelt laws in Queensland

As of 26 July 2021, even stricter laws apply to Queensland drivers relating to the use of mobile phones and seatbelts. The changes to the law include increased penalties and more enforcement of the rules.
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The role of guardians and attorneys in criminal law proceedings

The role of guardians and attorneys in criminal law proceedings

Important changes to the law surrounding guardians and attorneys were introduced in November 2020 which now expressly provides that a guardian or an attorney cannot enter a plea in a criminal proceeding on behalf of another individual.
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